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Last Updated: 11/20/2017
 

 Article of Interest - The Brain

Teenage Mutant Ninja Cortex

from the Boston Globe, November 3, 2002 (featured at www.educationnews.org)
For more articles visit www.bridges4kids.org.  

 
An article in the Oct. 2002 issue of the journal "Brain and Cognition" may offer a solution to one of mankind's last unsolved mysteries: teen angst.
 
According to neuroscience researchers at San Diego State University, moping, door-slamming, and a fondness for the Insane Clown Posse could be symptoms of a temporary brain disease. Having studied the ability of people between 10 to 22 years of age to quickly recognize other people's emotions, psychology professor Robert McGivern and his team concluded that adolescents may be impaired by ''a relative inefficiency in frontal circuitry prior to the pruning of excess synaptic contacts.''
 
Translation? Burgeoning nerve activity in the teenaged prefrontal cortex makes it difficult for those entering puberty to process basic social and emotional information - which won't be news to their parents.
 

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