Bridges4Kids Logo

 
Home ] What's New ] Contact Us ] About Us ] Links ] Search ] Glossaries ] Contact Legislators ] Reviews ] Downloads ] Disabilities ] IDEA ] Special Education ] Medicaid/SSI ] Childcare/Respite ] Wraparound ] Insurance ] PAC/SEAC ] Ed Reform ] Literacy ] Community Schools ] Children At-Risk ] Section 504 ] School Climate/Bullying ] Parenting/Adoption ] Home Schooling ] Community Living ] Health & Safety ] Summer Camp ] Kids & Teens ] College/Financial Aid ] Non-Public & Other Schools ] Legal Research ] Court Cases ] Juvenile Justice ] Advocacy ] Child Protective Services ] Statistics ] Legislation ] Ask the Attorney ]
 
 Where to find help for a child in Michigan, Anywhere in the U.S., or Canada
 
Bridges4Kids is now on Facebook. Follow us today!
 
Last Updated: 11/20/2017
 

Article of Interest - Nutrition in Schools

Printer-friendly Version

Bridges4Kids Logo

Jamie's Dinners Improve Behavior, Schools Say
Sarah Cassidy, Independent Online Edition, August 12, 2005
For more articles like this visit http://www.bridges4kids.org

 

Jamie Oliver's drive to rid schools of junk food has produced a big improvement in children's behavior, teachers say.

Schools which took part in the TV chef's experiment to provide nutritious meals report a massive improvement in children's concentration in lessons and a drop in the number of fights between pupils.

Children were now returning to afternoon lessons ready to learn having eaten a healthy lunch, whereas a diet of junk food and sugary snacks had previously left them aggressive and unable to concentrate, schools in Greenwich, south London, where Oliver pioneered his healthy eating program, said yesterday.

The biggest improvements have been seen in the children who had displayed the worst behavior.

Trisha Jaffe, the headteacher at Kidbrooke School, said: "Sugary and processed foods have a high impact on children's concentration and we found their behavior would deteriorate in the afternoon."

Greenwich was featured in the Channel 4 series Jamie's School Dinners, in which the chef expressed horror at the food fed to children in schools. He said: "I would feed it to my dog, but I wouldn't feed it to my mate, or my children."

Ministers have since pledged an extra 220m to improve school meals.

Greenwich Council intends to offer the new menus in all its secondary and primary schools. A spokesman said: "Schools are reporting better behavior and sickness in kitchen staff has gone down. Staff feel more motivated."

Jamie Oliver's drive to rid schools of junk food has produced a big improvement in children's behavior, teachers say.

Schools which took part in the TV chef's experiment to provide nutritious meals report a massive improvement in children's concentration in lessons and a drop in the number of fights between pupils.

Children were now returning to afternoon lessons ready to learn having eaten a healthy lunch, whereas a diet of junk food and sugary snacks had previously left them aggressive and unable to concentrate, schools in Greenwich, south London, where Oliver pioneered his healthy eating program, said yesterday.

The biggest improvements have been seen in the children who had displayed the worst behavior.

Trisha Jaffe, the headteacher at Kidbrooke School, said: "Sugary and processed foods have a high impact on children's concentration and we found their behavior would deteriorate in the afternoon."

Greenwich was featured in the Channel 4 series Jamie's School Dinners, in which the chef expressed horror at the food fed to children in schools. He said: "I would feed it to my dog, but I wouldn't feed it to my mate, or my children."

Ministers have since pledged an extra 220m to improve school meals.

Greenwich Council intends to offer the new menus in all its secondary and primary schools. A spokesman said: "Schools are reporting better behavior and sickness in kitchen staff has gone down. Staff feel more motivated."

     

back to the top     ~     back to Breaking News     ~     back to What's New

 

Thank you for visiting http://www.bridges4kids.org/.
 

bridges4kids does not necessarily agree with the content or subject matter of all articles nor do we endorse any specific argument.  Direct any comments on articles to deb@bridges4kids.org.

 

2002-2017 Bridges4Kids