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Last Updated: 11/20/2017
 

Disability Information - Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD)

 

CDC Information on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

General Information

Education & Classroom Accommodations

Michigan Resources, Support Groups, Listservs & Websites

National Resources & Websites

Articles Related to this Disability

Medical Information

Books & Videos

Personal Home Pages & Websites

 

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 General Information

Also see: CDC Information on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

 

What are FAS and FASDs?

Prenatal exposure to alcohol can cause a range of disorders, known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). One of the most severe effects of drinking during pregnancy is fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). FAS is one of the leading known preventable causes of mental retardation and birth defects. If a woman drinks alcohol during her pregnancy, her baby can be born with FAS, a lifelong condition that causes physical and mental disabilities. FAS is characterized by abnormal facial features, growth deficiencies, and central nervous system (CNS) problems. People with FAS might have problems with learning, memory, attention span, communication, vision, hearing, or a combination of these. These problems often lead to difficulties in school and problems getting along with others. FAS is a permanent condition. It affects every aspect of an individual’s life and the lives of his or her family.

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) is an umbrella term describing the range of effects that can occur in an individual whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. These effects include physical, mental, behavioral, and/or learning disabilities with possible lifelong implications. The term FASDs is not intended for use as a clinical diagnosis.

FASDs include FAS as well as other conditions in which individuals have some, but not all, of the clinical signs of FAS. Three terms often used are fetal alcohol effects (FAE), alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder (ARND), and alcohol-related birth defects (ARBD). The term FAE has been used to describe behavioral and cognitive problems in children who were prenatally exposed to alcohol, but who do not have all of the typical diagnostic features of FAS. In 1996, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) replaced FAE with the terms ARND and ARBD. Children with ARND might have functional or mental problems linked to prenatal alcohol exposure. These include behavioral or cognitive abnormalities or a combination of both. Children with ARBD might have problems with the heart, kidneys, bones, and/or hearing.

All FASDs are 100% preventable—if a woman does not drink alcohol while she is pregnant.

 

FASlink is the Canadian Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Internet support, information, advocacy and discussion forum.  http://www.acbr.com/fas/

 

Visit the Washington University Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit's website at: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu/.

 

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 Education & Classroom Accommodations

 

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 Michigan Resources, Support Groups, Listservs & Websites

Macomb County Fetal Alcohol Resource Education and Support (MCFARES) Coalition: c/o Arc Services, 43970 N. Gratiot, Clinton Township, MI 48036; 586-329-6722; www.MCFARES.org

 

Family Support Groups: Learn about FASD, obtaining a diagnosis, linking to services. Contact Charisse at charisse@MCFARES.org for more information.

 

Families and Supports Affected by FASD Yahoo group: (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FaSAFASD/) Yahoo information and support group for families affected by FASD.

 

Also visit www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fas/default.htmcq or www.nofas.org/main/index2.htm
 
 

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 National Resources & Websites

Parent Support Groups: Fetal Alcohol And Drug Unit Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Washington School of Medicine

 
United States Other International Canada

 

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Willco Building, 6000 Executive Boulevard
Bethesda, MD 20892-7003
Phone: (800) 729-6686
Phone: (888) NIH-NIDA
Web Address: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov
NIAAA provides pamphlets, brochures, and referral information about alcohol use problems. Information can be obtained by writing or calling or by printing it from the Web site.
 
National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS)
216 G Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: (202) 785-4585
Fax: (202) 466-6456
E-mail: information@nofas.org
Web Address: http://www.nofas.org
This is a nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating birth defects caused by drinking alcohol during pregnancy. It also is dedicated to improving the quality of life for those people with fetal alcohol effects and their families. The NOFAS national information clearinghouse provides information, resources, and referrals for people with fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. The organization also publishes a free quarterly newsletter for families and professionals.

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
1600 Clifton Rd.
Atlanta, GA 30333
Phone: (770) 488-7150
Fax: (770) 488-7361
Web Address: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/default.htm 
NCBDDD seeks to promote optimal fetal, infant, and child development; prevent birth defects and childhood developmental disabilities; and enhance the quality of life and prevent secondary conditions among children, adolescents, and adults who are living with a disability. The Web site has a wealth of information on relevant topics.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Family Resource Institute
P.O. Box 2525
Lynnwood, WA 98036
Phone: (253) 531-2878
Phone: (800) 999-3429
E-mail: vicky@fetalalcoholsyndrome.org

Web Address: http://www.fetalalcoholsyndrome.org
The FAS Family Resource Institute is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to identify, understand, and care for people who have been affected by fetal exposure to alcohol and their families, and to prevent FAS in the future. This organization provides a newsletter for people with FAS and their families, in addition to workshops and training programs for families and professionals.
 

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 Articles Related to this Disability

 MI Raising Awareness: Grant to Fight Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - Peggy Miller-Zelinko needs to set a routine for her son, Andrew. When he gets up, when he takes a shower, when he eats, when he does his school work, even when he uses the bathroom needs to be predictable. If she doesn't, Andrew, 12, falls apart.

 

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 Medical Information

MO Springfield to Get Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Clinic - The "problem child" in elementary school is getting early, better therapy these days, thanks to increased awareness of conditions such as attention-deficit disorder. But the true diagnosis for unusual behavior may go overlooked, because medical schools spend little time on the topic: fetal alcohol syndrome.

 

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 Books & Videos List from the University of Washington's Fetal Alcohol & Drug Unit

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Communities. Ann Streissguth. (1997) Brookes Publishing Company.

 

The Challenge of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Overcoming Secondary Disabilities. Ann Streissguth and Jonathan Kanter (Eds.). (1997) University of Washington Press.

 

O'Malley, K. & Streissguth, A. (2002) Clinical intervention and support for children aged zero to 5 years with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and their parents/caregivers. Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development. Click to view the pdf slide presentation that summarizes this article.

 

Developing Successful Interventions for Clients with FAS or ARND; a flyer created by the Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit and sponsored by March of Dimes (2002). Here is the pdf version of this flyer.

 

Follow these links to lists of selected publications:

Neuroanatomic/Neuropsychologic Analyses of FAS/FAE Deficits & Functional MRI of FAS/FAE

Prospective Longitudinal Study on Alcohol and Pregnancy

P-CAP/Birth to 3 Advocacy Model

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Follow-up Project

Interventions with FAS Patients

Prevention of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

 

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 Personal Home Pages & Websites

 

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